Moving Buildings

Moving Buildings

<div class="floatimgleft"><img alt="1888-hotel-moving.jpg" border="0" height="392" src="http://brooklyn11211.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/1888-hotel-moving.j…; width="500"><br><br><span class="caption">How Buildings are Moved<br><a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=COkvAAAAMAAJ&amp;pg=PA681#v=onepage&am… Strand</em></a></span></div><br style="clear: both;"/><p><a href="http://kottke.org/11/04/how-buildings-move">Via Kottke</a>, a look at how the Brighton Beach Hotel (all 5,000 tons of it) was <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=COkvAAAAMAAJ&amp;pg=PA688#v=onepage&am… about a quarter of mile back from the beach</a> - in one piece. This is from an 1888 article in The Strand magazine all about moving buildings - by boat, rail and on greased skids (the Brooklyn way, see below). The practice of moving buildings - pretty rare today - was remarkably common once upon a time.</p><p>It was common enough that housemoving was its own profession. B. C. Miller &amp; Sons (of 955 Dean Street), who did both the moving jobs pictured here were one of at least 16 housemovers listed in the 1897 <em>Lain's Brooklyn Directory</em> as housemovers. Miller &amp; Sons even advertised their work (and illustrated the Brighton Hotel job) in <em>Lain's</em>.</p><div class="floatimgleft"><img alt="moving-building-1888.png" border="0" height="293" src="http://brooklyn11211.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/moving-building-188…; width="531"><br><br><span class="caption">How Buildings are Moved<br><a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=COkvAAAAMAAJ&amp;pg=PA681#v=onepage&am… Strand</em></a></span></div><br style="clear: both;"/>